<mutex>

public member function
<mutex>

std::timed_mutex::try_lock_for

template <class Rep, class Period>
  bool try_lock_for (const chrono::duration<Rep,Period>& rel_time);
Try to lock for time span
Attempts to lock the timed_mutex, blocking for rel_time at most:
  • If the timed_mutex isn't currently locked by any thread, the calling thread locks it (from this point, and until its member unlock is called, the thread owns the timed_mutex).
  • If the timed_mutex is currently locked by another thread, execution of the calling thread is blocked until unlocked or once rel_time has elapsed, whichever happens first (meanwhile, other non-locked threads continue their execution).
  • If the timed_mutex is currently locked by the same thread calling this function, it produces a deadlock (with undefined behavior). See recursive_timed_mutex for a timed mutex type that allows multiple locks from the same thread.

All lock and unlock operations on the timed_mutex follow a single total order, with all visible effects synchronized between the lock operations and previous unlock operations on the same object.

Parameters

rel_time
The maximum time span during which the thread will block, waiting to acquire a lock.
duration is an object that represents a specific relative time.

Return value

true if the function succeeds in locking the timed_mutex for the thread.
false otherwise.

Example

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// timed_mutex::try_lock_for example
#include <iostream>       // std::cout
#include <chrono>         // std::chrono::milliseconds
#include <thread>         // std::thread
#include <mutex>          // std::timed_mutex

std::timed_mutex mtx;

void fireworks () {
  // waiting to get a lock: each thread prints "-" every 200ms:
  while (!mtx.try_lock_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(200))) {
    std::cout << "-";
  }
  // got a lock! - wait for 1s, then this thread prints "*"
  std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(1000));
  std::cout << "*\n";
  mtx.unlock();
}

int main ()
{
  std::thread threads[10];
  // spawn 10 threads:
  for (int i=0; i<10; ++i)
    threads[i] = std::thread(fireworks);

  for (auto& th : threads) th.join();

  return 0;
}


Possible output (after around 10 seconds, length of lines may vary slightly):

------------------------------------*
----------------------------------------*
-----------------------------------*
------------------------------*
-------------------------*
--------------------*
---------------*
----------*
-----*
*

Data races

The timed_mutex object is accessed/modified as an atomic operation (causes no data races).

Exception safety

If the timed_mutex is currently locked by the calling thread, it causes undefined behavior.
Otherwise, it offers the same level of guarantee as the operations on the duration object (for the type instantiations in <chrono>, this is a no-throw guarantee).

See also